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Top 8 Bee Pollen Benefits (No. 7 Is Remarkable)

2. Acts as an Antioxidant

Recent studies have revealed that enzymatic hydrolysates from bee pollen are beneficial for patients undergoing various diseases, such as cancer, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and hypertension. The antioxidant properties were measured in a 2005 study, and researchers found that it has remarkable antioxidant activity.

They witnessed high scavenging activities against active oxidative stress. Researchers even suggested that the inhibitory activities of pollen were similar to those found in fermented foods, such as natto, miso, cheese and vinegar.

3. Protects Against Liver Toxicity

One 2013 study published in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine found that chestnut bee pollen protects hepatocytes from oxidative stress and promotes the healing of liver damage caused by toxicity.

Rats with carbon tetrachloride-induced liver damage were separated into two groups — one group took two different concentrations of chestnut bee pollen orally (200–400 milligrams per kilogram a day), and one group was given silibinin, a medication that contains flavonoids.

The researchers detected that both treatments reversed the liver damage, but silibinin caused significant weight loss and death due to severe diarrhea when given to rats. These findings suggest that pollen is a safe alternative to the silibinin in the treatment of liver injuries and can be part of a liver cleanse.

4. Boosts the Immune System

Bee pollen has antimicrobial and antiviral properties. A 2014 study published in Food and Chemical Toxicology evaluated the biological actives of eight commercial bee pollen purchased from the market.

All of the samples exhibited antimicrobial activity. Staphylococcus aureus was the most sensitive to pollen, and candida glabrata was the most resistant.

Bee pollen may also be a natural allergy fighter. A 2008 study conducted in Japan investigated the effect of bee pollen on mast cell activation, which plays a central role in various allergic diseases.

The researchers performed in vivo and in vitro experiments and found that bee pollen does have anti-allergic action because of its ability to inhibit the activation of mast cells, which plays an important role in the early and late phases of allergic reactions.

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Written by Rachel Wilson

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